Anzac Configuration Bytes


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   Configuring the Anzac Interface
   AAFP "Config" Statement
   Configuration String Description -- Bytes #1 through #4
   Configuration String Description -- Byte #5
   Configuration String Description -- Byte #6
   Configuration String Description -- Byte #7
   Configuration String Description -- Byte #8
   Syntax and Sending the Bytes to a Printer
   Summary of Configuration Bytes
   Calculating Printer Management Options Byte #5
   Converting Binary Bits to Hex Bytes


 

 

 

 

 

Configuring the Anzac twinax controller

The SCS twinax interface controller in your Anzac printer has non-volatile memory to allow you to customize the standard setup defaults for your Anzac printer. These defaults are saved, and remain as the standard defaults -- even when the printer has been powered down.

Configuration Byte Functionality

The following pages will outline commands that can be sent to the printer from the AS/400 through the direct twinaxial attachment, or from a PC or any other computer which can attach to the parallel share port. To see examples that select the following options, please see Appendix A.

Each command is issued as a two character combination. If you are familiar with hexadecimal (hex), you may recognize that each command is in fact a hex value, which is stored in the Anzac controller for reference at power up.

A hex character is referred to as a Byte. Each command, or two character combination, will be referred to as a Configuration Byte in this documentation.

Background

On all types of "Bungleware" HC11 microprocessor boards, a utility exists to modify the operating personality, or "configuration," of a given machine according to possible requirements needed in its final environment. An example of which is the current difference between United States "Letter" paper and European "A4" size paper. This serves only as one of many possible examples of what "CONFIG" is able to do.

Reasoning Behind "CONFIG"

This is an attempt to pass the responsibility of creating different firmware versions out of the hands of programmers and into the "Factory". This is the prime and only valid reason for "CONFIG". All other uses are the result of a flow on effect, i.e. it is better to have hands on control rather than wait for a new firmware revision to be shipped to the customer.

As stated previously, all "Bungleware" boards are configurable to a lesser or major degree. In the case of FAX, OKI, MIO, Vanilla 2, and Screen, the changes are made at the IBM system via Anzac Advance Printer Functions (AAPF) commands.

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AAPF "CONFIG" Statement

¦=xx xx xx xx....=¦

The AAPF "CONFIG" statement is bounded by '=' symbols and contains an INDETERMINATE (variable length) string of HEX numbers separated by a space character.

The reason for variable length is that as new features are added to our firmware, the statement string must lengthen. It is guaranteed that any firmware shipped will operate with extra length fields (by ignoring them). It is also guaranteed that all firmware operates with reduced length fields (by not requiring all bytes of the full config statement). Currently, a full config statement contains 8 Hex bytes. Each byte has a subset of bits that control the config byte's function (see later in this handbook).

The config statement may be submitted to the interface via the parallel share port from a PC or via the twinax port as data to be printed.

Once an AAPF config statement has been sent, its effect is immediate, but might not be acted on until a subsequent relevant command is received, i.e. a change of paper size in a given bin is effective on the next paper bin selection from a job.

Any changes made via config statement are permanent. The changes stay in effect (even upon power off) until changed again (if ever) by a bootload or another AAPF config statement.

The config string is universal among all Anzac/Pinnacle/Apollo products, but components within the entire string are local to particular equipment models or technology, i.e. configuration bytes pertaining to lasers are ignored in firmware shipped for matrix printers and vice versa.


This is a FACTORY level entry. It is NOT generally intended for use by "customers" and is not published in the AAPF "Book of Words." It is subject to change and is not guaranteed in any way to "work" at the customer level. (Support for Anzac Factory persons however is very different and the subject of this section).


VOYEUR DUMP Mode

Apart from other details, voyeur test 7 always shows the bytes of configuration in the following order. It is important to re-emphasize that this byte string will lengthen in the future, but the order is permanent.

There is no attempt, and there will never be any attempt made to make the voyeur dump more "legible". This because:

a) we do not want to educate customers into our "esoterica," and

b) the order shown can be duplicated exactly to re-initialize the printer via the AAPF statement.

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CONFIGURATION STRING Description

There are currently 8 bytes that are printed out during the Address 7 test

Bytes #1 through #4 (xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx) : Bin selection

byte 1 = Bin 1

byte 2 = Bin 2

byte 3 = Envelope

byte 4 = Manual Selection Paper Size

Byte Value
Meaning
01
Executive
02
Letter
03
Legal
04
A4 (Metric European Size)
05
Monarch Envelope
06
Commercial 10 envelopes
07
DL Envelope (Europe)
08
C5 Envelope (Europe)
09
Executive Edge (See Note)
0A
Letter Edge (See Note)
0B
Legal Edge (See Note)
0C
A4 Edge (See Note)


Sheet size selection for the values of 09, 0A, 0B, & 0C are for the Anzac 3030 printer only. This gives the ability to print on the entire page, edge to edge. This option was implemented in revisions after .9TY. The 3030 may also use the standard values.


Bin1 and Bin2 have no meaning to the firmware; they generally correspond to "upper" and "lower" input trays in whatever order the device (printer) decides Bin1 and Bin2 belong. From the AS/400, however, we do not select "upper" and "lower;" we select "Bins".

"Manual" is not selected by the AS/400. It is there for use through AAPF ¦Ex¦ statements. This byte is independent of Byte 5 bit settings for Bin 3

These are standardized values. They apply equally to CANON LBP8-III using CAPSL language as they do to the HP 5Si running HPLASER PCL5e.

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Byte #5 (xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx) : Printer Management Options

In this byte, each bit is significant. The actual value of the byte must be calculated based on a decision of which printer features should be enabled or disabled. Familiarity with binary arrays and hexadecimal numbers, or access to a scientific calculator (or the Windows "Calculator" in the accessory folder) is necessary to convert the binary bits into a hexadecimal byte (see Appendix A).

Bit 0 : Vertical line compression (lasers only)

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Vertical Compression off
1
Vertical Compression on

The IBM 3812 and 3816 lasers can print on the entire area of the page. Most industry standard laser engines (such as the Hewlett-Packard and Brother) have an unprintable margin of 0.25" around the entire page. This can cause a problem on 11" stationary where the printable area is only 10.5" deep, yet 66 lines per page printing is required. The bottom 3 page lines or so will overflow onto the next form.

As a result, Anzac has added an option to the interface which allows for page compression, and will fit the data from an 11" form into 10.5" by a tiny compression of the line spacing.

Anzac printers support may forms design packages which specifically require that the job be printed exactly as it is presented. However, many users who are automating old print jobs from a dot matrix environment require a full 66 lines per page. Accordingly, there is a requirement for this variable option, which proves very useful to users in a mixed environment.


Bit 1 : Horizontal line compression (lasers only)

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Horizontal Compression off
1
Horizontal Compression on

As with Bit 0, this bit compensates for the IBM 3812 and 3816's ability to print on the full area of the page. If the stationary is 8.5" wide, the IBM 3812 or 3816 can print 85 characters across the page. The restrictions imposed upon HP laser emulations limit the horizontal printable area to 8.0 inches, which means that a maximum of 80 characters can be printed across the page.

This option, if set, causes a minute and automatic compression of all fonts, in both portrait and landscape modes to fit the full horizontal character line within the margins of an HP printer.


Bit 2 : Automatic envelope rotation

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Automatic landscape mode envelope printing off
1
Automatic landscape mode envelope printing on

Some users are moving IBM 5219 Daisywheel printer applications to lasers. The 5219 prints everything in portrait mode, including envelopes. However, many lasers feed in envelopes sideways, and rotate the image 90 degrees into landscape mode before printing.

The Bit 2 option automatically prints the data on envelopes in landscape mode, which allows printing from any RPG or OfficeVision application to be managed without specifically rotating the text to landscape when printing envelopes.


Bit 3 : Swap Bin1 and Bin2 paper selection

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Normal Bin selection
1
Swap Bin1 and Bin2 requests

Some laser printers have optional large input bin accessories which can offer 2,3, or 4 times the paper input capacity that the standard bin allows, and typically occupies the printer's standard Bin2 input position. Unfortunately, by default, the IBM System requests paper from Bin1. Some printers automatically designate these high capacity input bins as the primary bin. For those printers that do not change this designation, this command simply swaps the assignment of the input bins, so that Bin1 requests are drawn from Bin2, and Bin2 requests are drawn from Bin1.

As a result, the large input tray option can be used as the primary input bin without any OCL or RPG program changes.


Bit 4 : Job offset (jogging)

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Job offset off
1
Job offset on

Some Anzac laser printers support jogging; that is, physically offsetting the output of each print job to simplify job separation. While the IBM System may send such a command, often it does not. This option allows users to permanently select job offset separation for every print job.


Bit 5 : High Speed Graphics Printing

Bit Value
Meaning
0
High density graphics on, high speed graphics off
1
High speed graphics on, high density graphics off

The Vanilla 2, along with OKI and MIO boards, supports AAPF, a high level interpreter, which, among its other features, can print bar codes and other graphics. This bit selects a choice of either high density graphics, or high speed graphics (which print as much as four times as fast), depending on the print quality and speed requirements of the end user's applications.

This command is only operational with dot matrix printers. Anzac laser printers always print high resolution graphics, as it does not hinder or slow their performance in any way.


Bit 6 : (Model dependent -- see below)

Shuttle Selection (Anzac 50xx series printers only)

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Printer is not an Anzac 50xx series printer
1
Select Anzac 50xx series printer

This bit is selected only if the printer is an Anzac 50xx series printer.

Laser printers (with a third paper input tray)

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Printer does not have Bin3
1
Printer has Bin3

Some of the new laser printer releases have a third paper input tray (often referred to as a "multipurpose tray"). The standard interface settings default Bin3 requests to an envelope feeder accessory, but with Bit 6 set, Bin3 requests become redirected to the next selectable tray (often a flip-down type multipurpose tray).

The Laser bit value for tray selection was implemented 12/94. Code revisions created prior to that contain the above Shuttle selection only.


Bit 7 : IBM System /38 Installations

Bit Value
Meaning
0
Non-System /38 environment
1
System /38 environment

This bit controls a special detection capability of Anzac printers at power-on. When a code-rich interface is powered on, it checks its current device address to see if there is another device communicating with the IBM System at that came address. If there is such communication, the interface does not attempt to communicate. Instead, it flashes the "parity" light or all of the indicator lights on the "backpanel" to indicate that there is another device at this address (if the interface attempted to communicate, it would bring down the conflicting device or all of the other devices on that particular line).

The System /38 creates peculiar feedback on the twinax line which prevents the interface from consistently determining whether or not there is another conflicting device at the same address, so this bit allows the address checking feature to be disabled in System /38 installations. In all installations other than System /38, this bit should be set to "0."

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Byte #6 (xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx) : Printer Emulation

This byte controls the printer ID, or device response, that is sent back to the IBM host system. The ID allows the system to "autoconfigure" the device if the system is set up to do so. Currently, we support the 3812 emulation on our laser printer products, 5225-1 emulation on the thermal printer products, and both the 5225-1 and 4214-2 on the matrix products. Not all of the emulations are available with every firmware revision.


The firmware is laser / matrix independent. This byte can be set for a laser emulation even if the printer is a dot matrix machine and vice-versa. Firmware drives the intended printer the best way it can independently. Examples are sending a 3812 TESTREQ to a matrix printer, or, sending a pie chart to a laser (BGU graphics).


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Byte #7 (xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx) : Country (Default character set)

Bit Value
Meaning
00
Multinational
01
USA
02
Austria/Germany
03
Belgium
04
Brazil
05
Canadian/French
06
Denmark/Norway
07
Finland/Sweden
08
France
09
Italy
0A
Japan - English
0B
Japan - Katakana
0C
Portuguese
0D
Spain
0E
Spanish Speaking
0F
United Kingdom

The IBM character set the printer uses must change for each country it is installed in, due to the various symbols used specifically in each country (i.e. lira and yen symbols as well as individual letters accented with umlauts and tildes). The interfacefirmware can support all of the different special characters required. This byte selects the country where the printer is installed, and accordingly, the character set that will be used.

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Byte #8 (xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx) : AAPF Control Character

Bit Value
Meaning
7C
AAPF character is a broken vertical bar " ¦"
xx
Sets the AAPF character to the ASCII value of hex " xx "

AAPF utilities are initialized and terminated by this control character. If the default character " ¦ " is used elsewhere as a deliberately printable character (i.e. used to create borders), the character may be changed to one not used by selecting a different hex value.

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Appendix A

Setting the Configuration Bytes

Every Configuration Byte must be present in the command. If it is irrelevant for the printer, it will be ignored.

The Syntax for use is as follows:

Command
Function
¦ACE ON¦
Attention getter -- alerts the Anzac interface to look for a special command.
¦= xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx=¦
New configuration bytes as described in this manual -- "xx" represents new config bytes.
¦ACE OFF¦
Special function terminator -- the Anzac interface ceases looking for special commands and resumes normal operation.

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Sending the Byte Setting Command to a Printer

This command is sent to the printer as plain, printable text :

¦ACE ON¦ ¦= xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx =¦ ¦ACE OFF¦

It can be sent from a word processor such as OfficeVision, or even entered on the Command line of an AS/400 terminal, then sent as a "screen print" to the printer. It can also be sent from a PC through the parallel share port on the printer, if available.


Do not press the "Enter" key when this command is placed on the command line. This sequence is a command that is not understood by the IBM system, is only understood by the Anzac interface, and will return an error message if sent to the IBM system as a command sequence.


The Anzac interface has a finite ability to change configuration bytes, thus this feature should not be used on a regular basis. This feature is primarily for use by the Anzac Programming and Technical Support departments and any misuse of these abilities will be deemed "abuse" and will not be covered under any maintenance agreement.


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Summary of configuration bytes

Configuration Bytes are always in the following order:

Byte 1
Byte 2
Byte 3
Byte 4
Byte 5
Byte 6
Byte 7
Byte 8
Bin 1
Bin 2
Envelope
Manual Feed
Printer Management Options
IBM Device Emulation
Country
AAPF Control Character

For example, standard configuration for our 3012 laser printer is

02 02 06 03 47 2D 01 7C

These settings indicate :

02
02
06
03
47
2D
01
7C
Bin 1 contains Letter Size paper
Bin 2 contains Letter Size paper
Envelope feeder is set for Com10 size
Manual Feed will allow Legal Paper
Printer Management (See below)
IBM Device Emulation is set for 3812
Country is set for USA
AAPF Control Character is "¦"

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Printer Management Options (how to calculate the XX value above)

Each Byte is composed of 8 bits, each of which has either a Ø or 1 value. These options all have "yes" and "no" answers, which makes life very easy. Start with the following table by asking questions about your needs, then each answer will determine the bit values for the whole byte.

In the example above, if you have an Anzac 3012 laser printer with the 500 page input bin and multipurpose tray attached to an IBM AS/400, you would determine the following settings:

This printer is not communicating with an IBM System /38 and is not an Anzac 50XX. I do not want high speed graphics or jog/offset the output between each job. The printer automatically swaps bin 1 and 2 so that the high capacity tray becomes my primary input tray and I want to automatically rotate any text that is being sent to my multipurpose tray for envelopes, and to automatically compress 66 line reports to fit on the page.

Bit
Question
Options
Answer
7
System /38?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
Ø
6
Anzac 50XX or Bin 3?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
1
5
High Speed Graphics?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
Ø
4
Jog output?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
Ø
3
Swap bin 1/bin 2?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
Ø
2
Rotate envelopes?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
1
1
Compress horizontal page?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
1
0
Compress vertical page?
No = Ø, Yes = 1
1

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Bit to Byte Conversion

We now need to convert these binary bits into the complete hexadecimal Configuration Byte 5. If you have a PC, the easiest way to convert this is to use the Windows Calculator accessory.

Windows 3.1 :

In the Accessories Folder in your Program Manager, you will see a calculator icon. Click the icon twice to load the calculator.

Windows 95 :

Click on your start bar and select "Programs." From "Programs," find "Accessories," and in that group, you will find the Calculator.

  1. From the "View" option in the toolbar, select "Scientific".
  2. From the top of the calculator, select the "Bin" option (for Binary).
  3. Now if you read down the Answer column in the graph on the previous page, take your answer Ø 1 Ø Ø Ø 1 1 1, and type this into the Windows calculator.
  4. To convert this value from Binary to Hexadecimal, simply click the "Hex" button on the calculator. The calculator will immediately tell you that the Hex value is 47.

This is the value required by Configuration Byte 5 for the Multiple Printer Management Option.

The completed configuration command in the example above would read :

¦ACE ON¦ ¦= Ø2 Ø2 Ø6 Ø3 47 2D Ø1 7C =¦ ¦ACE OFF¦

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